Brunswick Cardiology
Brunswick Cardiology
Brunswick Cardiology

Services: Hospital Based


Coronary AngioplastyPeripheral AngioplastyCardiac PacemakersPeripheral StentsNuclear Stress TestEchocardiography

Coronary Angioplasty

A coronary angioplasty is a common medical procedure performed to open up blockages within the coronary arteries that have developed as a result of atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis causes a narrowing of the arteries and gradually prevents blood from properly flowing to the heart, leading to a condition known as coronary artery disease.

During the angioplasty procedure, an incision will be made in the arm or groin, into which a catheter will be inserted. A contrast dye will also be injected to highlight the clogged areas during the procedure. A tube with a deflated balloon will then be inserted through the catheter to the blockage, and then inflated to widen the artery and push plaque aside, allowing blood to flow through smoothly. To hold the artery open and prevent narrowing from occurring again, a mesh tube called a stent may be placed inside.


Peripheral Angioplasty

Clogged arteries can occur in nearly any area of the body, not just the heart. Over time, plaque and other debris build up in the arteries (atherosclerosis), causing them to narrow. This affects proper blood flow and can lead to serious cardiac complications if left untreated.

Angioplasty involves inserting a deflated balloon into the affected area and then slowly inflating it to push plaque to the side and widen the artery. A mesh tube called a stent may also be placed in the artery to hold it open after the procedure and reduce the risk of re-narrowing. This procedure is most effective in treating larger arteries or those with short narrowed areas.


Cardiac Pacemakers

People who suffer from an abnormally slow heartbeat may benefit from an artificial cardiac pacemaker, a device that tracks the heartbeat and maintains an adequate frequency to allow oxygen and nutrients to flow through the body. The heart pumps blood through the body in a continuous cycle through a steady heartbeat. The heart rate is controlled by signals sent from the body's natural pacemaker, called the sinoatrial (SA) node, but may be affected by disease.

An artificial pacemaker can send electric signals to the heart to help it pump properly when needed. This relieves symptoms caused by an abnormal heartbeat and helps prevent further damage.


Peripheral Stents

Stenting is a common treatment method used to expend arteries within the lower extremities affected by peripheral artery disease (PAD). This condition involves blockage, hardening or narrowing of blood vessels throughout the body as a result of a buildup of plaque. This reduced or blocked blood supply can significantly increase a personís risk of having a heart attack or stroke.

A stent is a wire mesh tube that can help keep affected arteries open once they have been expanded during a balloon angioplasty procedure. Stents are placed over a catheter that is then guided to the affected artery, where it will expand and remain in place after the catheter is removed. Over time, the inside lining of the artery will grow over the metal surface of the stent.


Nuclear Stress Test

A typical stress test involves the patient exercising on a treadmill while electrodes attached to the body record the heart's response to physical activity. During a nuclear stress test, a radioactive substance is injected into the bloodstream. A special scanner is used to detect this substance and capture images of the heart muscle as the patient exercises. A nuclear stress test may be effective in determining the cause of chest pain, checking the prognosis of patients after a heart attack and determining the effectiveness of previous procedures.

Nuclear Stress Test


Echocardiography

Echocardiography is a painless test that uses sound waves to create images of your heart. It provides your doctor with information about the size and shape of your heart and how well your heartís chambers and valves are working.

Echocardiography